Dare to be something different

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I’ve kept these shots for the longest time and just don’t know when to share it. Now I dared myself to show and tell about my cousin, Jesse, taken when we were younger. The photos reminded me of Arnold Schwarzenegger … Continue reading

The Problem of Belonging: Being a Catholic in a Big Family

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This gallery contains 4 photos.

We are a family of 13 and we are Catholic. I happen to be the tenth in line and drop in the bucket in Catholic community. As a younger sister, the rule is to listen to your elders. be respectful and … Continue reading

The real reason behind this incorrectly attributed article

Recently, I received an e-mail about “Some Rules Kids Won’t Learn in School” and that Bill Gates gave this speech to a group of graduating high school.
bill-gates

Rule 1: Life is not fair – get used to it!
Rule 2: The world doesn’t care about your self-esteem. The world will expect you to accomplish something before you feel good about yourself.
Rule 3: You will not make $60,000 a year right out of high school. You won’t be a vice-president with a car phone until you earn both.
Rule 4: If you think your teacher is tough, wait till you get a boss.
Rule 5: Flipping burgers is not beneath your dignity. Your grandparents had a different word for burger flipping: They called it opportunity.
Rule 6: If you mess up, it’s not your parents’ fault, So don’t whine about your mistakes, learn from them.
Rule 7: Before you were born, your parents weren’t as boring as they are now. They got that way from paying your bills, cleaning your clothes and listening to you talk about how cool you thought you were. So before you save the rain forest from the parasites of your parent’s generation, try delousing the closet in your own room.
Rule 8: Your school may have done away with winners and losers, but life has not. In some schools, they have abolished failing grades and they’ll give you as many times as you want to get the right answer. This doesn’t bear the slightest resemblance to anything in real life.
Rule 9: Life is not divided into semesters. You don’t get summers off and very few employers are interested in helping you find yourself. (Do that on your own time.)
Rule 10: Television is not real life. In real life, people actually have to leave the coffee shop and go to jobs.
Rule 11: Be nice to nerds. Chances are you’ll end up working for one.

It sounds really good but I have a hunch it did not come from him, so I snooped around.

As it turned out this list was taken from Dumbing Down Our Kids: Why American Children Feel Good About Themselves But Can’t Read, Write, written by Charles J. Sykes with added three more rules.

Rule 12: Smoking does not make you look cool.
Rule 13: You are not immortal. (See Rule No. 12.)
Rule 14: Enjoy this while you can. Sure parents are a pain, school’s a bother, and life is depressing. But someday you’ll realize how wonderful it was to be a kid. Maybe you should start now. You’re welcome.

Actually, the only reason why I am posting this is so that I have a photo of him. He is so darn cute!

R.U.L.E.S – Blog for Peace February 2013

In my site, there is no badge on Bloggers for Peace because I did not join.  I mentioned to Kozo, if it’s okay to write just about it.  Request accepted.  
I am not much of a joiner, follower or a member of any kind of organization.  I am not even a registered member of the church I go to.  The reason being, my belief is we are all One Body, One Mind.   By default, I am a member, no need to sign up. 
Whew, now I have said, I feel peaceful. Ah…. 
A few years ago, I volunteered as a Big Sister for one of the students at False Creek Elementary School.  My little sister’s name is Megan.  We were sisters for at least three years. 
What I want to touch upon is how I valued the school’s R.U.L.E.S.  It stands for:
R – Respect
U – Understanding
L – Learning
E – Education
S – Safety
The school has a Code of Behaviour: Keeping our school safe, healthy, happy and a productive place to learn. These are basic rules that elementary students understand.  It is a basic training on growing up as a future peacemaker. 
I remember when I was in elementary, we were taught Good Manners and Right Conduct in a public school.  The title of the program is different from today’s education but in essence it’s the same principle.
Since religion is not part of the curriculum in a public school, it teaches peace and compassion.  Recently, I received an e-newsletter about children’s choir.  I’ve asked for permission if it’s okay to share it. Request granted. 
In my own personal opinion, we have to teach peace early to our children.  I don’t have any children.  Megan, my little sister, was the only child I became closed to at the school and we had so much fun in our peaceful ways. 
Here’s the video of the children singing just one candle for peace.
 
And here is my candle for everyone.
 What does it take to be peaceful articles:
Love is the answer
A call to service