World Mental Health Day

Well, that is another hope gone. My life is a perfect graveyard of buried hope.

I’ve used this statement before as a lamentation but it no longer applies to me because there is always hope. There is always help.

We are more fortunate during this era that there is so much resources available when it comes to mental health. Now, we are open about it due to media-hype-awareness and medical professions are better trained.

Below is a two-page document that I can refer to when something troubles me. I am sharing this information hoping that it might benefit others taken from Feeling Good.

Steven Taylor of UBC Department of Psychiatry said “Psychology plays a central role in pandemics, influencing the spreading and containment of diseases, and shaping pandemic-related distress and socially disruptive, divisive and potentially harmful phenomena such as panic buying, racism and protests against pandemic mitigation restrictions.”

He wrote the Psychology of Pandemic in 2018 Lessons Learned For The Future.

Be well and remain well.

Sunday Snippet

This is supposed to be a reblog but I am having difficulty doing it in my second generation iPad.

The source is from friarmusing, I call him FrG as a term of endearment, short for Fr. George.

His writings are enjoyable to read and exceptionally good reads. This post is about a list of reading materials.

This post is by no means complete, thorough, or makes any claim to being the last word. It is just a slice of what is out there on September 4th that caught my eye, looked interesting, and so I gave it a read. Maybe you will too.

▪Worried About Breakthrough Infections? Here’s How to Navigate This Phase of the Pandemic – New York Times.

▪Long-Haulers Are Fighting for Their Future – The Atlantic

▪Six Important Questions About Booster Shots Answered – Smithsonian

▪The Coronavirus Could Get Worse – The Atlantic

▪Pandemic Psychology – The Guardian

The Pandemic Psychology from The Guardian surprised me. As I dig deeper, a Canadian Psychiatrist from UBC Department of Psychiatry published an article that I never encountered in our news media written by Steven Taylor in 2018 pre-covid era. I have so much respect for this department because they helped me reshape my faulty thinking due to brain disorder.

He interpreted that pandemics “are essentially a psychological phenomenon and about the behaviors, attitudes and emotions of people” and that “the psychological footprint is bigger than the medical footprint”.

That, Taylor says, is not to downplay the significance of the disease to those that have become sick or died, but that many more people have been psychologically affected. The analysis was fleshed out in another academic paper, published in Canadian Psychology, in which he wrote that “pandemics are not simply events in which some harmful microbe ‘goes viral’”.

He wrote: “Psychology plays a central role in pandemics, influencing the spreading and containment of diseases, and shaping pandemic-related distress and socially disruptive, divisive and potentially harmful phenomena such as panic buying, racism and protests against pandemic mitigation restrictions.”

Lesson learned: Sunday sermon is not all about the Gospel.

It’s OK to not be OK

Soft kitty, warm kitty, little ball of fur!
Happy kitty, sleepy kitty, purr purr purr!

My idea of having a good time lately is having healthy cats, bird watching, and walking around checking the surrounding gardens.  Living alone, I can withstand quiet moments. Don’t get me wrong; I am not a hermit.  I see people daily and have incidental warm conversations with strangers to add a pep to our life.

Self-isolation and social distancing is not a big deal since I am an introvert living with mental health issues.  When Covid started, I am well into my second year of self-isolation to stabilize my health.  When the government imposed health rules to manage the transmission, I am more equipped to handle the situation.  I am OK with this.

Lately, more people are having mental health issues due to lockdown, isolation, or keep a small bubble.  My heart goes out to those who are now showing clinical symptoms of mental illness.  I am not OK with this.

Please seek help.

January 28 is the annual Let’s Talk day sponsored by Bell kicks off.

On Bell Let’s Talk Day, Bell donates 5 cents to Canadian mental health programs for every applicable text, local or long-distance call, tweet or TikTok video using #BellLetsTalk, every Facebook, Instagram, Pinterest, Snapchat, TikTok, Twitter and YouTube view of the Bell Let’s Talk Day video, and every use of the Bell Let’s Talk Facebook frame or Snapchat filter. All at no cost to participants beyond what they would normally pay their service provider for online or phone access.

Join us!

The Power of One

Gallery

“The amazing thing is that chaotic systems don’t always stay chaotic,” Ben said, leaning on the gate. Sometimes, they spontaneously reorganize themselves into an orderly structure.” ― Connie Willis, Bellwether All it takes is one to start a commotion or chaos on … Continue reading