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When push comes to shove, historically speaking, people will quote the bible to harness the power to govern and dominate even though their action is vile. Why not start from the beginning. Blame it on the apple. Then the women. … Continue reading

Let it be written, Let it be done.

The gathering of Truth and Reconciliation Commission ended with the walk in solidarity with the aboriginals and non-aboriginals.  Thousands braved the day in a wet, wild, and wonderful walk.

We were banging drums, singing traditional songs, wearing button blankets and hats as we marched along the Georgia Street.

walk-for-reconciliation-0130922

The stories told were very horrific and sad about the treatment the aboriginals received from the white people especially at the residential schools.  These are the survivors who came to have their stories documented for the history books.

As horrific as it was, the gathering will be the beginning of a journey toward reconciliation. Canada is stepping forward to share the pain it created.  From here, we can move towards healing.

The keynote speaker for this event was Dr. Bernice King, the daughter of Martin Luther King, Jr.

One day, you’ll be able to join hands together and say in the words of my father and it will be a truth in this nation.  Free at last, free at last, and thank God almighty we are free at last.”

May the stars carry your sadness away,
May the flowers fill your heart with beauty,
May hope forever wipe away your tears,
And, above all, may silence make you strong.
Chief Dan George

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Behind the Dream & beyond words

Photo Credit: Common GroundOn August 28, 1963, 34-year-old Martin Luther King Jr. passionately and eloquently shared his ‘Dream’ – in 17 minutes and 1,700 words – and the world awakened. 
As King stood at the foot of the towering memorial to Abraham Lincoln – he had signed the Emancipation Proclamation 100 years earlier – A. Philip Randolph introduced the Baptist preacher/civil rights leader as “the moral authority of our nation.” 
Chosen as the sixth and final speaker – to allow him all the time he needed – King was to deliver the urgent message and declarative statement on the future of the movement. 
Jones, a Juilliard-trained clarinettist – as well as a lawyer – could craft persuasive speeches with lyrical cadence and rhythm. But during the thunderous applause, as thousands wept openly, he told King that his “I Have a Dream” improvisations had eclipsed the musical genius of Charlie Parker and John Coltrane. 
In his book, Behind the Dream: The Making of the Speech That Transformed a Nation, Jones reports that the famous phrase wasn’t in the draft. He believes the sudden, riveting crescendo was God-given. 
“I hadn’t experienced him speak that way before, as if some cosmic transcendental force possessed him,” recalls Jones. “I remember commenting, ‘This crowd should be ready to go to church.’ It was spellbinding, electrifying, lightning in a bottle.” 
The master orator created his masterpiece, composing, cutting and pasting material in his mind, in real time. Preaching powerfully, he stirred the moral conscience of millions, tapping into core values and yearnings of humanity, speaking prophetically about living life without hatred and violence, inviting his audience to mountaintops, imagining and sharing new perspectives and vision. 
The making of a speech by Bruce Mason: Common Ground.
 
To read the full speech:  I Have A Dream:  Common Ground
To listen to the speech:  I Have A Dream : YouTube

Promise that you will not laugh

Thank you for participating with the Daily Drawing Contest.  These were your choices: 
Staff 2 received 1 vote – Hungry bird
Staff 5 received 3 votes  – Martin Luther King
Staff 9 received 2 votes – Hungry fishes 
Good eyes, for they were all chosen winners.  
I am so glad that I managed to entice my peers to draw and join the contest.  In our department, only three of us participated and all of us are winners, we cleaned up the prizes. 
Remember in my previous post that I prefer sacred geometry: a line and a circle.  I drew Staff 9 titled “Namaste”.  It’s my self-portrait.  Only half of my face is showing because I am too shy plus the pink hair for anti-bullying. 
Many times, I mentioned that I love hummingbirds and that is Staff 3.  It’s was mostly strokes of straight and oblique lines. 
And the third picture I drew was the family of First Nations.  I have also mentioned before in a post being with the Elders in North Vancouver and Starr who received the “Courage to Come Back” award.  Again, circles and straight lines. 
As much as I am trying to use the right side of my brain, somehow, the left side of my brain is dominant.  What I am aiming for in the future, hopefully, my brain will become centered. 
And now for the winning picture, I received an 8.5 x 11 wire-bound sketch pad to further my ambition to become an artist. 
Namaste

Namaste

Share is a verb

I LOVE SHARING and it’s my favourite word.  Share is a verb.  It’s an action word.  This was my opening word in my post Monday’s Peace News Captured on video. 
Sharing is very self-fulfilling.  It brings out the humanity in me especially LOVE.  In my reflection, this love is a gift from my God that is meant to be shared.  
So, here go I… 
After yesterday’s Daily Prompt: Polite Company, I am still deeply moved by Martin Luther King, Jr.’s history, not so much about the controversial topic about religion and politics. 
Out of deep admiration and respect for him, I want to share this song with you:

We Shall Overcome.

And a beautiful story Morning Story: Do Unto Others.

Have a blessed day.

Pax Tecum, (Peace be With You)  _/\_ Seeker