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Buddha never claimed to be God. Moses never claimed to be Jehovah. Mohammed never claimed to be Allah. Yet Jesus Christ claimed to be the true and living God. Buddha simply said, “I am a teacher in search of the … Continue reading

No matter where I go, I’m always going home

Hang on. There are no disappointments or calamities that tomorrow will not cure.

Hang on. There are no disappointments or calamities that tomorrow will not cure.

It’s a dreamy day, a slight dusting of the snow;
The cats are snuggly ensconced on the couch.
On a day like this, I love listening to Rod McKuen.
A writer, a poet, a singer.

I collected so much of his poetry books.
Read and reread it
Pages earmarked on some
Scribbles on the pages of the book
Names of people who I can relate to the poetry
Most of these people are long gone from my life.

Rod kept them alive through his poetry.
It’s kind of silly to keep the memories of the past
And the weight of this is a burden for most times.
I wish I could carry it with a smile just like Buddha
Life doesn’t work out that way, one must let go.
Letting go of the memories starts by letting go of the books.
I gave away all of Rod’s poetry books.

Now I am going home.

“Home is something that you carry in your head
It lives within your heart forever.

And so I know no matter where I go in life
I’m always going home.

Happiness: Buddha style

Happiness is not about maximizing and accumulating pleasurable experiences. As the Buddha pointed out, impermanence is the order of the day. Pleasures are inherently fleeting and don’t provide a solid foundation for enduring satisfaction.

When you take care of meaning, positivity has a way of taking care of itself. In other words, you don’t have to strive to be happy and collect all those extroverted types of “happy” experiences. Instead, when you engage with meaningful projects in the present moment, particularly ones that benefit others, positive emotions naturally follow.
buddhaThe Buddha’s version of happiness might be most aptly captured by the term that often gets translated as equanimity. Equanimity refers to being there in the middle of things, without needing things to be different than they are. Equanimity brings acceptance and interest to what is happening at the moment.

From this perspective, it is possible to be “happy” even when things are not going well. There is great freedom found in the capacity to be equanimous. Perhaps this is why the Buddha always has that contended little half-smile on his face.

The Buddha didn’t need excitement, thrills, and “good times” to be happy. His happiness was quiet contentment that abided in every moment, regardless of what was happening. Introverts, like the Buddha, have access to a rich interior experience. We need to learn to keep that inner intensity from becoming an obsession, rumination, and worry.

We can embrace this aspect of our Buddha-nature when we expand our definition of happiness to move beyond high arousal, extrovert-dominated one to include low-arousal introverted-based feelings.

Happiness resides in contentment, peacefulness, and appreciation of everything that is happening around us in every moment. This version of happiness is more robust, available, and enduring. Happiness is always ever a breath away.

To read the full article, click on this link:   Psychology Today: The Buddha was introvert

 

 

The Fall of Autumn – For Hue

Another guessing game of weekly photo challenge while I am out and about.  Here I am creating my theme again: the falling leaves of autumn taken last year 2012.

Fall is a lovely time when the leaves turn to many shades of colours from yellow to dazzling red.  When every leaves look like flowers and the trees became so excited in showing off it’s majestic structure.

Who cannot fall in love with the fall season.  It’s enough to bring ones senses to heightened awareness that I am nothing in front of these trees and it is a humbling experience.

Trees planted at Metrotown Shopping Centre.

Trees at the School Board and the path of golden leaves.

Trees on the boulevard of East 12th Avenue and painted red sidewalks covered with fallen leaves

Buddha

Buddha

“It is only her in large portions of Canada that wondrous second wind, the Indian summer, attains its amplitude and heavenly perfection, — the  temperatures; the sunny haze; the mellow, rich delicate, almost  flavoured air: Enough to live — enough to merely be.”  –   Walt Whitman, Diary in Canada

Buddha says “Life is suffering.”

Photo by: Daehyun Kim Source: New York Times

Photo by: Daehyun Kim
Source: New York Times

Buddha says “Life is suffering.”  
Every time someone says this quote, I add: “Get with the program!” 
Yes, I agree.  What I do with suffering is either use it or lose it. 
Useful suffering teaches me something; it makes me wiser and cut away any useless limbs so that I may bear fruit, so to speak.  It makes me a better person, a better sister, a better friend and then some.  
Useless suffering is negative and depressing.  I cannot make sense of it.  When I try to analyze the situation, it causes analysis paralysis.  My spiritual, emotional, mental and physical well-being deteriorates.  I feel it’s a dead-end street and sometimes death is a good way out.  It is devastating. 
I have my fair share of suffering.  Family and friends help tremendously with their outpouring love to help me recover.  Behind this love is the deep faith we have that help me redeemed myself.  It is called Redemptive suffering. 
“Redemption accomplished through love remains always open to all love expressed through human suffering.”  Since my faith is based on the theology of Jesus, I offer my suffering to Him and I am privilege that He allows me to unite my suffering.  This is the greatest way for me in order to rise above the existential angst and cesspool of the soul. 
I can offer the grief, depression, limitation, frustration, pain and sorrow that I experience without suffering.  The uselessness of suffering becomes powerless.  Of course, I have fear.  I am never useless no matter what condition I am in.  And I can say the same to you, you are never useless.  In fact, other people can learn from us; we may be doing more good for humanity.  I know.  Being in the company of women at Talitha Kuom, I learned humility, love, perseverance, trust, compassion and patience. 
To keep up with my answer “get with the program”, I take a look at the area of my life and make sure that none of it is useless and wasted.
 
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