Do you understand? Do you see?

Red Kite RunnerA good book gives me something to ponder, something to learn, something to move my senses. Reading The Kite Runner just did that to me. To sum it up:

Thou shall not steal, thou shall not lie, thou shall not cheat.

“Now, no matter what the mullah teaches, there is only one sin, only one. And that is theft. Every other sin is a variation of theft. Do you understand that?” […]
“When you kill a man, you steal a life,” Baba said. “You steal his wife’s right to a husband, rob his children of a father. When you tell a lie, you steal someone’s right to the truth. When you cheat, you steal the right to fairness. Do you see?” […]
“There is no act more wretched than stealing, Amir,” Baba said. “A man who takes what’s not his to take, be it a life or a loaf of naan…I spit on such a man. And if I ever cross paths with him, God help him. Do you understand?” (3.29-34)
Credits:  Red Kite Runner ~ oil canvass by Allan Chow
The Kite Runner: Khaled Hosseini 

I’m Done!

I received an e-mail from my sister that she’s done! And I am not!

Today is her first day of not having to go to work. RETIRED!

Am I jealous?  Of course, I am.  She’s only 60 and a day, I think.

Now, I have to look for this book to keep her busy, or maybe I’ll teach her how to knit, bake, do gardening, or better yet blog at WordPress.

Retirement: When you quit working just before your heart does.  — Unknown wise person

Rights: Yes or No

A year and a day

Reader’s Bill of Rights

The right to not read
The right to skip pages
The right to not finish
The right to reread
The right to read anything
The right to escapism
The right to read anywhere
The right to browse
The right to read out loud
The right to not defend your tastes

Adapted from “Better Than Life” by Daniel Pennac

Blindness ~ A Parable

A city is hit by an epidemic of “white blindness” that spares no one.   
Blindness
 
As Blindness reclaims the age-old story of a plague, it evokes the vivid and trembling horrors of the twentieth century, leaving readers with a powerful vision of the human spirit that’s bound both by weakness and exhilarating strength. 
Blindness by José Saramago, a Nobel Prize–winning author,  a magnificent, mesmerizing parable of loss. 
Photo Credits:  New Yorker Magazine
Book Review by: Goodreads

WPC Lunchtime: Meatless Friday

I always pack my lunch.  Being Friday and feasting on a meatless Friday due to Lent season, the menu is: 
Sautéed mushroom and  canned salmon topped with shallots and garlic
Rice for a little bit of carbohydrates
Cut fresh pineapple
Ambrosia apple to cleanse my palate 
Walla:  Lunch fit for a Princess. 

 Having a brain freeze all day, I did not eat lunch.  I had a couple of oranges instead and went out for a walk.  Should it have been a sunny day, this is my favorite place to eat lunch; with nature. 

 Escargot anyone?
WPC Lunch Mar 15, 2013

 Needless to say, I had my lunch for supper.

DP: That Stings! – Flight of a Bumble Bee

Franz Kafka said, “we ought to read only books that bite and sting us.” What’s the last thing you read that bit and stung you?

When was the last time I borrowed a book from the library?  It was such a long time ago.  There is a period in my life that I devour all the books at the library and suddenly BOOM, I stop reading. 

Bite me, I dare you.  Vampire books are enjoyable to read because they bite.  What stings them is that they still have their humanity, the love to be amongst the living.  Ah, love, it makes my heart grow fonder.  It’s lovely to feel the love of the Vampires.  I feel so much love.  Just wait a minute, that doesn’t sting.

There are a couple of books beside me that I pick up to read between TV commercials.  I tell you, I can read a chapter by the time the ads are over, too many commercials on TV.  “All I really need to know I learned in kindergarten” by Robert Fulghum and “The Pleasure of Finding Things Out” by Richard P. Feynman.  These books are filled with humor and they both sting, a little.

The book that I keep on coming back that I never seem to finish reading is titled “Awareness … the perils and … opportunities for reality” written by Anthony de Mello.  This is not an easy read or a romantic novel.  This book cuts through the core, and I bleed just by reading it.

When I picked up the book, it opened on this chapter, and I quote in part:
At a loss for Words:  “God does not die on the day we cease to believe in a personal deity.  But we die on the day when our lives cease to be illumined by the ready radiance of wonder renewed daily, the source of which is beyond all reason. We don’t have to quarrel about a word, because “God” is only a word, a concept.  One never quarrels about reality; we only quarrel about opinions, about concepts, about judgments.”

 And this is the part the stings, hurts and takes a lot of reflection.
“Drop your concepts, drop your opinions, drop your prejudices drop your judgments; and you will see that.” 
 I fight and struggle with this regularly as I write my post and read others.