Bloom where you are planted

At the Manor, there are 48 suites with two or one-bedrooms and bachelor suits. Most of the people who live here are immigrants from the Chez Republic, Bosnia, India, Ireland, Iran, Korea, Japan, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Russia, Serbia, Sweden, Yugoslavia and other countries that I can’t think of.

I am one of them.

Bee Home

The Birdhouse took over by bees.

Now, we are citizens of Canada. We made The Manor our home.

“O Canada, our home and native land” is the first line of our National Anthem.

Rock Garden

Front entrance rock garden.

The residents here are lovely, approachable and pleasant. We enjoy chatting from the balcony, window or entranceway as I potter around the garden. I must admit the garden is an icebreaker for many, even from passersby.

Flowers from the Garden

Bloom where you are planted.

One of the tenants took up photography and had a field day taking macro shots of all the flowers in the garden. The end product was framed and gifted to our lovely manager of the building.

When I cut flowers from my hard-earned gardening, these go to the manager as well.

Our Doors

Our Doors.

From single to couple to third-generation residency, I’ve witnessed them. Most of these people love to have their family around living in the same roof. It’s good to see a couple having a child or two and be able to bring a surviving parent to add the responsibility of taking care of their children.

Of course, I get to play with the children when they were younger in the garden.

Lucy and Grace

The Blue Room

Kindness plays a big important role in living in this community. If you are unkind, who else will help you but your neighbour?

I must admit I find myself special because the manager allowed me to paint my suite when I had one of my episodes on mental breakdown. The activity kept my focus away from living in my head.

The end result was brilliant.

Pistachio green paint in the living room, kitchen and hallway. A hint of a rose colour for the bathroom.  Skyblue for my bedroom to calm me down.

Oh, these little things, I am grateful.

Oh, I get by with a little help from a friend.

Gallery

This gallery contains 2 photos.

Bees are wonderful and helpful creatures. Photographing bees with little knowledge on how to make them presentable does give injustice how beautiful they are. It’s difficult to express myself when I am totally in awe with these insects let alone … Continue reading

Empty Nest

If you built it, they will come.  And they did. 
I built a sanctuary for birds, two birdhouses. Eventually, they did come. 
Finches were the first family that came to nest. I watched the Finches built their nest in the bigger birdhouse and saw the young ones took their first flight.  That was such a delight to see.  Then they returned and nested again. A total of eight birds came to life and it was thrilling to be a part of it. 
The following year, the chickadees discovered the blue house.  A new generation were born in this house. 
Last year the bees took over. I have no heart to shoo them away.  They needed a place to stay and besides they can pollinate the flowers.  They were mason bees. 
The chickadees came back to nest but it was too late because the bees are not moving out any sooner.  Needless to say, I was “bird less” for a year. 
This year, I waited for the bees to come back.  They were no show.  So I decided to clean the nest. 
Much to my surprise, I heard the sound chickadee-dee-dee; the best known sound that gives the bird its name.  
Between Me, Maurice and Lucy, we imprisoned ourselves inside my sanctuary. The balcony is off limits. 
Feeding time

Feeding time

The feeding process is in full gear for at least three weeks. From sunrise to sunset the parents are in and out of the birdhouse to feed their offspring.  I can only imagine that there are at least four tiny birds inside the birdhouse. 
I have already seen some of the heads poked out from the hole and the parents are now feeding them from the hole and no longer going inside the house.  It must be a fairly cramp lifestyle inside when the offspring have grown their feathers and big feet. 
Mom and Pop Chickadee

Mom and Pop Chickadee

By this time, the parents are starting to look haggard.  All they do is feed the bird.  Such love and drive to provide food for their young is amazing.  And I thought, how much we could learn from them.

Last night, I noticed both parents were perched on the bamboo line and were sounding off a different call.  I am unsure what it means but I have the feeling that they are calling their offspring out. 
Lucy and Maurice watching the parents

Lucy and Maurice watching the parents

Even Maurice and Lucy were looking at them, intently in a calm manner.  The cats were listening to the chattering of the birds.  I wonder if animals understand each other.

 I focused all my attention to the Chickadees since the departure of Nymeria.
 Today I came home, all is quiet.  Not a single chirp. 
I went outside and called the birds.  Chickadee-dee-dee.  Nothing. 
It’s so strange to hear no chirping sound and the ruckus of the young ones when it’s feeding time.
 What is stranger, Maurice and Lucy did not even come out to the balcony with me.  They must have known the birdhouse is now empty. 
A feeling of emptiness came over me.  An empty nest syndrome.
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