50 Things To Do Before You Die

in year 2009, I bought a BC Magazine to celebrate its 50 years featuring a list of what to do in the province I live for the past 45 years.  Here I will remain for the rest of my life.

We call this province beautiful British Columbia!

The list could go on. These are just a teaser.

Forest Bathing

A bird on guard for thee.

  1. HIKE the West Coast Trail
  2. DIVE the Emerald Sea
  3. HUNT for mythical monsters
  4. CYCLE the Trans Canada Trail
  5. BE ALONE with nature
  6. MOTORCYCLE through the Kootenays
  7. HURL YOURSELF from a great height
  8. SURF a West Coast wave
  9. BACKPACK the Chilkoot Trail
  10. SET FOOT on every Gulf Island
On top - Copy

Balu Pass

  1. SAUNTER along the Seawall
  2. GLIMPSE BC’s wild horses
  3. DANCE at a powwow
  4. GO TUBING in the Okanagan
  5. GAWK at Squamish eagles
  6. PADDLE the Bowron Lakes
  7. PHOTOGRAPH a wild bear
  8. BARE IT ALL on Wreck Beach
  9. MOSEY through hoodoo country
  10. SUMMIT a mountain
Atlin BC walking the highway

Walking towards the lake to check it out.

  1. TOUR the Duffrey Lake loop
  2. DRIVE BC”s Alaska Highway
  3. WHALE WATCH at Telegraph Cove
  4. RIDE the Seven Summits Trail
  5. WITNESS the northern lights
  6. SOAK in a natural hot spring
  7. DISCOVER ancient petroglyphs
  8. BOAT up Bute Inlet
  9. GET GOBSMACKED by mountain light
  10. BOARD a BC ferry
Atlin BC look out

View from higher grounds. Beyond is the frozen lake

  1. SKI into O’Hara Lodge
  2. RUN a wild river
  3. VISIT a volcano
  4. DEVOUR BC at Feast of Fields
  5. FOLLOW dinosaur footprints
  6. FLY A KITE on Wickaninnish Beach
  7. WALK BAREFOOT in the forest
  8. BOUNCE through Barkerville
  9. BITE into a BC apple
  10. TAKE the road less travelled

Jimmy and Green Apples
41. REVEL in a wildflower meadow
42. SCALE THE Stawamus Chief
43. MAKE A 50-YEAR PLAN to visit every BC Park
44. SAIL through Haida Gwaii
45. WAKE UP some place wonderful
46. PLAY HOMAGE to the Cheewhat Giant
47. ZIP across the sky
48. HEAR THE ROAR of a mighty waterfall
49. DO some good
50. RAISE A GLASS of BC wine

Sunflowers and Nicole

Well, I’ve only done half of this. If I was born here, probably, I would have done most on this list tripping along the back country roads with a bumper sticker “Get those rocks off my road!”

Beauty under my naked eyes

Catch a falling star and put it in your pocket save it for a rainy day ~ Perry Como

Snowflake

It’s snowing. Finally, I’ve been waiting for it. The last time it snowed was on Christmas. As it falls, I tried catching a flake. As soon as it touches my skin, it melts into water. I figured that my body temperature is not cold enough to keep it for a second or two. Trying to take a photo using an iPhone 6 seemed to be a futile activity, but I persevered. This flake stayed long enough, and I have used a burst of shots.

Since it rains so much here in Vancouver, it’s so easy to forget the snow.

Snowflakes

Today is a good day to inspect the snow.  The air is so dry and the flakes are hardly sticking.  I tried looking at the snow on various surfaces and colours. Red, blue, green, yellow, orang, umbrella, nettings, plants and even on my jacket.  It’s was fascinating to seem them glitter like diamonds.  

The snowflake makes its first appearance in recorded history when people identified individual snow crystals—with their distinctive six-fold symmetry—as the constituent elements of falling snow. The earliest known account was in 135 B.C., when Chinese scholar Han Yin wrote “Flowers of plants and trees are generally five-pointed, but those of snow, which are called ying, are always six-pointed.”

Subsequent Chinese writers mentioned snowflake symmetry as well, an example being the 6th-century poet Hsiao Tung, who penned: “The ruddy clouds float in the four quarters of the cerulean sky. And the white snowflakes show forth their six-petaled flowers.”

“The snow crystals . . . come to us not only to reveal the wondrous beauty of the minute in Nature, but to teach us that all earthly beauty is transient and must soon fade way. But though the beauty of the snow is evanescent, like the beauties of the autumn, as of the evening sky, it fades but to come again.” ~ Wilson A. Bentley

Canadian Loon vs American Eagle

IMG_2212

A loon defends itself against a swooping bald eagle. (Jon Winslow)

Beaking news … fatal clash between a bald eagle and a loon protecting its chicks, Canada’s loonie mascot stabbed America’s national bird through the heart.

We know conflicts between bald eagles and loons have soared in recent years as a result of the recovery of our eagle population. We are seeing more and more eagle predation on loon chicks and even adult loons. Who would think a loon would stand a chance against such a powerful predator? (Blogspot)

The Giver and The Receiver

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This gallery contains 2 photos.

For two years, I’ve waited when the birds will return. Lo and behold, I heard chirping and saw this little guy checking our the bird house. Who is more jubilant? Needless to say, me! Trying so many ways to give nature … Continue reading

Happy Feet

Gallery

This gallery contains 5 photos.

The March of the Penguins brings me to an animated movie Happy Feet 2 where they danced to the music of The Lord of the Dance written by Sydney Carter. It was at the Vancouver Aquarium I saw penguins for the first … Continue reading

The Sacred Journey of Salmon, Bald Eagles and A Bear


Salute to the Sockeye “Song for the Salmon” ~ Salmon Society

Photo by: Fred Zhang published by National Geographic October 23, 2014 Daily Dozen

Photo by: Fred Zhang published by National Geographic October 23, 2014 Daily Dozen

“Sockeye salmon is an anadromous species of salmon found in the Northern Pacific Ocean and rivers discharging into it. This species is a Pacific salmon that is primarily red in hue during spawning. Juveniles remain in freshwater until they are ready to migrate to the ocean, over distances of up to 1,600 km. Their diet consists primarily of zooplankton. Sockeye salmon are semelparous, dying after they spawn. Photo location: Sorrento, BC, Canada”

One of my co-workers went to a salmon festival last month to witness the famous salmon run. The rain was shining (raining hard) and the temperature was above normal (balmy). Needless to say, there wasn’t much to see and she came home disappointed.

For salmon’s survival, the water temperature has to be between 3 to 15 Celsius and it influences the incubation rate of the eggs and the time they hatch.

And here comes November, a perfect weather. The salmon braved swimming upstream, spawned and stop eating. They are just too tired from the ordeal of migrating to fresh water, have no more energy and died.

With an abundance of salmon along the river, this is a perfect season for the bald eagles and the bears to feed on them. What better way to have a Fraser Valley Bald Eagle Festival but watch out for the bears!

Photographer: Danny Chan ~ 1st Place Winner

Photographer: Danny Chan ~ 1st Place Winner

As for the bear, I am deeply saddened by the news yesterday that a West Coast express train hit a bear.

Right place at the right time bears fruit

Bear

“Photography is always the same thing — being at the right place at the right time,” said Lawrence, a wildlife photographer for 50 years whose latest shots can be found at Kootenay Reflections.com.

How did he do it?

It’s almost unbearably cute.

A once-in-a-lifetime shot of a grizzly bear appearing to set up a photo has a B.C. wildlife photographer in the middle of a viral cyberstorm.

East Kootenay-based Jim Lawrence was keeping his distance — as he has for 50 years now — taking long-distance shots of a grizzly hunting for spawning salmon.

“He’s a male, about five years old, and he was fishing on the other bank of the river,” said Lawrence, who won’t reveal where the photo was taken for fear a hunter will take out his new-found friend.

“I set my camera up in a clearing in the brush, hoping to get a clear shot.

“You can never predict what a wild animal will do, so all of a sudden he crosses the river and starts scrambling up the bank.”

So Lawrence, a spry 67, hightailed it out of there, abandoning his tripod and camera.

“I ran up to my truck, and grabbed another camera,” Lawrence told The Province. “The bear started sniffing around the camera — it was saturated with my scent.”

While the grizzly investigated — appearing to be trying to set up a shot of his own — Lawrence fired away with his backup camera, capturing some startling images of the big bruin.

 

Source: The Province ~ Wildlife Photographer

中华人民共和国朋友们好

Chinese Fisherman

Chinese Fisherman

我在遥远的加拿大温哥华想着你们

我知道中国是一个很美丽的国家

您好吗?

你是从哪里来的?

谢谢你 (xièxienǐ )

Translation:
Hello to the People of Republic China
I am thinking of you from Vancouver, BC, CANADA.
I understand that China is a beautiful country.
How are you?
Where are you from?
Thank you.

Photo Credit: National Geographic

Tequila!

Did I get your attention?  Nope, I am not serving Tequila.  Instead this is an introduction to an American Woodcock dancing to the tune of Tequila!


Tim Flanigan
 
This is a hen that has been caught by a winter storm that is preventing her from probing for her earthworm diet. The “dance” is actually a form of seismographic testing in an attempt to encourage an earthworm to move so that her ultra-sensitive feet can detect it and she can probe for it. She normally eats nearly her body weight in worms daily. This bird is in trouble.

Oh dear, I hope the bird will find other ways to forage.