Canadian Loon vs American Eagle

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A loon defends itself against a swooping bald eagle. (Jon Winslow)

Beaking news … fatal clash between a bald eagle and a loon protecting its chicks, Canada’s loonie mascot stabbed America’s national bird through the heart.

We know conflicts between bald eagles and loons have soared in recent years as a result of the recovery of our eagle population. We are seeing more and more eagle predation on loon chicks and even adult loons. Who would think a loon would stand a chance against such a powerful predator? (Blogspot)

The Giver and The Receiver

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This gallery contains 2 photos.

For two years, I’ve waited when the birds will return. Lo and behold, I heard chirping and saw this little guy checking our the bird house. Who is more jubilant? Needless to say, me! Trying so many ways to give nature … Continue reading

Happy Feet

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This gallery contains 5 photos.

The March of the Penguins brings me to an animated movie Happy Feet 2 where they danced to the music of The Lord of the Dance written by Sydney Carter. It was at the Vancouver Aquarium I saw penguins for the first … Continue reading

The Sacred Journey of Salmon, Bald Eagles and A Bear


Salute to the Sockeye “Song for the Salmon” ~ Salmon Society

Photo by: Fred Zhang published by National Geographic October 23, 2014 Daily Dozen

Photo by: Fred Zhang published by National Geographic October 23, 2014 Daily Dozen

“Sockeye salmon is an anadromous species of salmon found in the Northern Pacific Ocean and rivers discharging into it. This species is a Pacific salmon that is primarily red in hue during spawning. Juveniles remain in freshwater until they are ready to migrate to the ocean, over distances of up to 1,600 km. Their diet consists primarily of zooplankton. Sockeye salmon are semelparous, dying after they spawn. Photo location: Sorrento, BC, Canada”

One of my co-workers went to a salmon festival last month to witness the famous salmon run. The rain was shining (raining hard) and the temperature was above normal (balmy). Needless to say, there wasn’t much to see and she came home disappointed.

For salmon’s survival, the water temperature has to be between 3 to 15 Celsius and it influences the incubation rate of the eggs and the time they hatch.

And here comes November, a perfect weather. The salmon braved swimming upstream, spawned and stop eating. They are just too tired from the ordeal of migrating to fresh water, have no more energy and died.

With an abundance of salmon along the river, this is a perfect season for the bald eagles and the bears to feed on them. What better way to have a Fraser Valley Bald Eagle Festival but watch out for the bears!

Photographer: Danny Chan ~ 1st Place Winner

Photographer: Danny Chan ~ 1st Place Winner

As for the bear, I am deeply saddened by the news yesterday that a West Coast express train hit a bear.

Right place at the right time bears fruit

Bear

“Photography is always the same thing — being at the right place at the right time,” said Lawrence, a wildlife photographer for 50 years whose latest shots can be found at Kootenay Reflections.com.

How did he do it?

It’s almost unbearably cute.

A once-in-a-lifetime shot of a grizzly bear appearing to set up a photo has a B.C. wildlife photographer in the middle of a viral cyberstorm.

East Kootenay-based Jim Lawrence was keeping his distance — as he has for 50 years now — taking long-distance shots of a grizzly hunting for spawning salmon.

“He’s a male, about five years old, and he was fishing on the other bank of the river,” said Lawrence, who won’t reveal where the photo was taken for fear a hunter will take out his new-found friend.

“I set my camera up in a clearing in the brush, hoping to get a clear shot.

“You can never predict what a wild animal will do, so all of a sudden he crosses the river and starts scrambling up the bank.”

So Lawrence, a spry 67, hightailed it out of there, abandoning his tripod and camera.

“I ran up to my truck, and grabbed another camera,” Lawrence told The Province. “The bear started sniffing around the camera — it was saturated with my scent.”

While the grizzly investigated — appearing to be trying to set up a shot of his own — Lawrence fired away with his backup camera, capturing some startling images of the big bruin.

 

Source: The Province ~ Wildlife Photographer

中华人民共和国朋友们好

Chinese Fisherman

Chinese Fisherman

我在遥远的加拿大温哥华想着你们

我知道中国是一个很美丽的国家

您好吗?

你是从哪里来的?

谢谢你 (xièxienǐ )

Translation:
Hello to the People of Republic China
I am thinking of you from Vancouver, BC, CANADA.
I understand that China is a beautiful country.
How are you?
Where are you from?
Thank you.

Photo Credit: National Geographic

Tequila!

Did I get your attention?  Nope, I am not serving Tequila.  Instead this is an introduction to an American Woodcock dancing to the tune of Tequila!


Tim Flanigan
 
This is a hen that has been caught by a winter storm that is preventing her from probing for her earthworm diet. The “dance” is actually a form of seismographic testing in an attempt to encourage an earthworm to move so that her ultra-sensitive feet can detect it and she can probe for it. She normally eats nearly her body weight in worms daily. This bird is in trouble.

Oh dear, I hope the bird will find other ways to forage.