Tell Me A Story

How do you respond to this question or statement when I ask you “tell me a story” instead of “how are you?”

Is it an art to be able to respond to a simple question? Or you’d rather not talk about it? As I get older, I noticed even in my family, I could sense their discomfort in sharing even the best of life’s situation. Thank goodness, I am learning to be still.

There is a site that offers vestige stories of women that are open to storytelling.

o

Let’s share meaningful narratives.

Vestige is the poetic synthesis between the essence of minimalistic beauty and the gravity of storytelling. Stories collected from women of different paths form the basis of our designs, which are then woven, sewn or embroidered into each garment. Storytelling has long established its place as the most essential tradition of all human culture. We hope this precious custom can extend beyond the literature and media we consume, and permeate the very products we use in our daily lives.

Photo credit: Vestige Story

4 thoughts on “Tell Me A Story

  1. I naturally tell people stories. It’s my form of conversation. I’m not sure it’s always welcome — it takes more time than people want to listen for a story — even a short, thoughtful one — to spin itself out. I like listening to stories, too. Conversation is just a strange thing — mostly, I think, it’s a kind of lubricant for social contacts — do what needs to be done and move on. In my small town, though, people have not lost the art of “visiting” which is really wonderful.

Please share your reflection. Thank you.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s