Suicide and the Narrative of Choice

COMPASSION… what we need is compassion for people who are suffering from any disease. For people that commits suicide or survive suicide, blame does not help or saying How can you do this! LEARN, we need to learn from another. I am still learning from my own history. This post is the best one I can relate to. As for now, I am filled with gratitude being alive. Faith, family, care givers and bloggers who shared their experience. Let us help one another understand with compassion.

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Whilst reading about the tragic death of the great Robin Williams I repeatedly stumbled upon the narrative of choice. Places like Psychcentral spoke about suicide being an “insidious choice”, but a “choice” nonetheless, so much so that they repeated the word to drive the message home. Meanwhile, whilst perusing social media I repeatedly came across variations of “people who commit suicide are selfish”, “how can anyone do that to their family?”. These sorts of comments make me twitchy. We’ve all heard them before.

In my own case they were personalised and weaponised, “How could YOU do that to your children? Do YOU not care about them?” I did, that was the problem. For some time I had felt like a millstone around the necks of my family. I loved them, but hated myself and could only see the ways I made their lives worse. After 2 failed suicide attempts in…

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3 thoughts on “Suicide and the Narrative of Choice

  1. To the people who believe it is a “choice”: that mentality reflects to me their complete lack of understanding the mechanics of depression, and not even a teaspoon’s worth of human physiology. Selfish? One could not even look at that razor’s edge; the gravity, weight and enormity of what pushes a person to end his/her life. Or to even entertain such thoughts, seems totally incomprehensible to the inexperienced. I understand the writer’s “twitchy-ness”, I concur. Which is why I couldn’t bare to read anything about this sad event, especially opinion pieces.

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