The Good Samaritans

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The Good Samaritan

*Bonus Material: “I’ll be praying for you.”
In my last post I listed “have you tried praying about it?” as one of the things I wished you wouldn’t say to me. Now, I don’t want you to take that statement out of context. I was referencing the belief that prayer will make my mental illness disappear, or that I’m mentally ill because “I let the devil in”. I said this in my last post, and I’ll say it again; “My mental illness is not caused by the absence of God, or presence of the devil… it’s a chemical imbalance that I’ll have to live with during my time on Earth, regardless of my relationship with God.”

Now, I want to make one thing abundantly clear. I am a Christian. I believe in prayer. I believe that Jesus, the Son of God, is the only way to achieve Salvation. I also believe that no one will ever love me as much as Jesus loves me. Therefore, I would love it if you would pray for me. But, just pray for me, as me. Don’t try to pray my mental illness away, that’s not the way it works. Pray for my piece of mind. Pray for me to always have a close relationship with God. Pray for me to be a good messenger; to bring kindness and joy to others.

Offering to pray for a person is always appropriate, if done for the right reason. So, when you offer to pray for someone, or suggest that they pray, talk to God first, and make sure you are coming from a place of love.

Source: 10 Reassuring Things I Want to Hear You Say: Mental Health Awareness
By ELIZABETH MOSLEY-BANKS
Painting: Luke 10:30-37 by Dan S. Siglos

Personal Note:
I am grateful for Elizabeth to have written “Harmless Things” You Say That Hurt Me: Mental Health Awareness and providing a solution in a follow-up post Reassuring Things I Want to Hear You Say: Mental Health Awareness.  Thank you, Elizabeth.

From the ten things, I chose the topic of prayer because I belong to a strong Catholic upbringing. I feel resigned to matters of life at the moment as I am going through another blow-up of mental instability.  I depend on all those who pray for me, care for me and their kindness. Thank you, all.

 

Pray for me, instead.

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Westminster Cathedral, London, UK

“Have you tried praying about it?”
Yes. The answer is yes. I pray constantly.
I pray that God will give me the strength to get out of bed to feed and care for my dogs when I’m having an episode of bipolar depression.
I pray that God will steady my voice, so I won’t constantly over talk others when I’m stuck in an episode of bipolar mania.
I pray that God will strengthen my resolve when I have racing thoughts of worthlessness that could lead to self-harm.
I pray that God will help me be strong, and learn to control my emotions, so I can be a mother someday.
I also pray about hundreds of things that have nothing to do with my mental illness.
So, yes, I pray.

These “prayer” comments hurt, they really hurt. For example, a few weeks ago I posted a blog about my struggle with depression, someone who read it said to me; “that’s you letting the devil in, you have to pray harder.” That comment hit me like a punch directly to the gut; upon hearing it I immediately got dizzy, nauseous, and frantic. I know, I know, their comment probably came from a good place… But it made me feel so empty. My mental illness is not caused by the absence of God, or presence of the devil… it’s a chemical imbalance that I’ll have to live with during my time on Earth, regardless of my relationship with God. Sure, a strong relationship with God makes everything more bearable, but praying won’t make my bipolar disorder go away. Praying, will, however, help me become stronger in facing the adversity that life has given me. So I pray.

Source:  10 “Harmless Things” You Say That Hurt Me: Mental Health Awareness
BY ELIZABETH MOSLEY-BANKS

Personal note: Praying can be hard when I am having difficulty controlling mental illness. So, please, pray for me instead.

Special Report

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Katie Stubblefield lost her face when she attempted suicide at 18. The images that tell her story are difficult to look at—but her remarkable journey reveals something profound about our humanity. It’s a story of trauma, identity, resilience, devotion, and medical miracles. … Continue reading

The Doctor is In

Like to write? An invitation from MDABC. So, I submitted a story. Little did I know that it will be published at WordPress. Thank you.

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Peanuts

It’s so right that we need is a warm hug and a pet as a companion to soothe our delicate emotional disorder. This is my favorite clip of Peanuts.

When I was hospitalized due to major depressive disorder, the good doctor at Lions Gate Hospital brought pets to work, massive greyhound dogs. Four of them. They were therapy dogs.

I am not a pet person. Never been. Needless to say, I stayed away from the dogs.

For a person with a mental illness, I supposed it shows on my face and behavior even when I don’t talk about it.  A sensitive person however, may emphatically pick up on it.  A wise manager who lives next door to me in the complex mentioned that it would be good for me to have a cat. So I did.

Enter Maurice and Lucy.

Little did I know, these cats would have a…

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